Adventurer Advancement

Adventurers begin the game typically as callow young adults and, through time and game play, may develop into heroes.They do this by improving the Common and Advanced skills they have, learning new skills, studying magic, seeking the secrets of Heroic Abilities and by improving their Characteristics which, in turn, help other Attributes to improve.

Improving Characteristics
Adventurers can gradually improve their Characteristics, becoming more intelligent, stronger or dextrous over time. Characteristics improve at a much slower rate than skills but can have more of an effect on an Adventurer. The process of increasing a Characteristic through exercise is abstracted through spending Improvement Rolls in a similar way to improving a skill– however the cost to do so is far higher.

  • Improving a Characteristic by +1 point costs a number of Improvement Rolls equal to the Characteristic’s current value; hence, improving a Characteristic from 10 to 11 would cost 10 Improvement Rolls.

Improvement Rolls, when used to improve Characteristics can be stockpiled from one allocation to the next but the player must state that his Adventurer is using these stockpiled Improvement Rolls towards a Characteristic increase – and stipulate which Characteristic is to benefit.

Skill Self-Improvement
Successful use of a skill indicates that your character will be able to improve his or her ability in that skill. An Improvement roll made at the end of the adventure determines whether or not actual improvement has been realized.

  • House Rule- Whenever your character successfully uses a skill and the gamemaster agrees that the success is worth an Improvement roll, you should place a checkmark in the small box next to that skill on your character sheet. This checkmark is called a skill improvement check. Only skills that have skill improvement checks next to them can be increased in this manner.

In addition to earning skill improvement checks through skill rolls, the gamemaster may tell you that your character automatically earned a check in the experience box, usually through significant exposure to the skill being used successfully.

The gamemaster will only allow skill improvement checks whenever skills are successfully used in stressful situations. An attack against a helpless target is not a stressful situation and does not deserve a skill improvement check. Likewise, taking an hour to pick a lock is not a stressful situation— but doing the same task in one combat round, as guards approach, is a stressful situation, and deserves a check.

The gamemaster determines when skill improvement checks are made; generally allowing them after the characters have had quiet time to ponder recent events. This is conveniently judged to be a game week or so, but may be more or less than a week. During a long evening’s play the characters may earn several moments where they can see if their skills improve. A gamemaster may disallow experience rolls if this reflective time is interrupted by another adventure, but character growth and learning is an important element, and should be encouraged.

If enough time has passed, you may make a skill improvement roll for each skill improvement check on your character sheet.

Improvement Roll Modifier
Every Adventurer has an Improvement Roll Modifier, based on the CHA Characteristic, of between –1 and +1, or more. This represents the relationship an Adventurer has with his community, peers and colleagues, who offer their services or advice, or, if CHA is particularly low, the difficulty of attempting to improve one’s capabilities without the assistance of others. The number of Improvement Rolls an Adventurer has to spend is modified by the value of the Improvement Roll Modifier.

Using Improvement Rolls
A player can choose to spend one Improvement Roll to attempt to increase one known skill.

  • Select the skill to be increased and roll 1D100. Add the Adventurer’s INT Characteristic to the result of the 1D100 roll.
  • If this 1D100 result is greater than the skill’s current score, the skill increases by 1D4+1 points.
  • If this 1D100 result is equal to or less than the skill’s current score, the skill only increases by one point.

Learning New Advanced Skills through Self-Improvement
An Adventurer can learn a new Advanced Skill through spending Improvement Rolls. Two
Improvement Rolls give the Adventurer the Advanced skill at its basic Characteristic-derived score.

Some Advanced skills however, cannot be learned through simply spending Improvement Rolls. The following Advanced Skills can only be gained through instructional training by a teacher:

  • Craft
  • Culture– if studying a culture completely alien to one’s own.
  • Engineering
  • Healing
  • Language
  • Lore- with the exception of Lore (Regional).
  • Teaching
  • Sorcery and Manipulation

Improving Common and Advanced Skills Through Training
As well as using Improvement Rolls to increase skills, skills can also increase through dedicated training. For this to occur, the following conditions need to be met:

  • The Adventurer has sufficient time to dedicate to training– usually a period of Downtime.
  • Access to a teacher or mentor, either one-to-one or via a school, academy or cult.
  • Funds to pay for training.

To attempt a skill improvement through training the Adventurer spends one week in full time study with his teacher or mentor. At the end of the week he makes a 1D100 roll and compares it to his current score in the skill. Only one skill at a time can be increased through training.

  • If the roll is less than the skill’s current score, the skill increases by 1%. The Adventurer has not made significant progress through study.
  • If the roll is equal to, or greater than, the skill’s current score, the skill increases by a number of points equal to the Adventurer’s INT divided by five (rounded up), plus the teacher’s Teaching critical range (if the teacher has the Teaching skill).

Learning New Advanced Skills Through Training
The following Advanced Skills can only be learned by an Adventurer if he has a teacher or mentor to teach him:

  • Craft
  • Culture– if studying a culture completely alien to one’s own.
  • Engineering
  • Healing
  • Language
  • Lore- with the exception of Lore (Regional).
  • Teaching
  • Sorcery and Manipulation

It takes one month for the Adventurer to emerge with the Advanced Skill at its basic, Characteristic derived score. From that point on, the skill can then be improved through either Improvement Rolls or training.

  • The teacher of the skill must be a professional, i.e. know the skill at 50% or higher.

Learning a new Advanced Skill does not require a 1D100 roll to be successfully made; all that is necessary is the time and money needed for training. However, if the trainer has the Teaching skill, the time it takes to learn the new Advanced Skill is reduced by one day for every 10% he has in Teaching.

Training Limits
An Adventurer cannot continually improve a skill through training: after increasing a skill by training his next improvement needs to be through a Self-Improvement Roll. Once that is accomplished, he can then improve that skill through training once more, if he meets the training conditions.

Adventurer Advancement

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